Saturday, July 31, 2010

July


Today is July 31.

What a month July has been! It has been full to bursting. . . .



*Celebrating our freedom, which never gets old, and I pray never will.
*Teaching a full course at UNA in little more than three weeks: intense but successful.

*Lightning striking our house during an afternoon thunderstorm, melting the computer while I sat right in front of it, burning a streak from top to bottom of the huge poplar right off the deck, knocking off part of the deck in its anger, running through copper pipes in the house until it burned an exit, spending its energy in a second that seemed like an eternity.

*Cucumbers and squash perishing in the record heat. The tomatoes dug in and continue to fill out biscuits and salads.

*Sharing hurt and losses and joy and music with dear friends.


*Finding a new connection group full of strength and kindness.
*Watching granddaughters grow brown and tall as they soak up the summer.
*Enjoying music at Handy Fest, tapping our feet and fanning in rhythm.

It is bittersweet. With the passing of July, more than half the year is gone, moving so fast I'm just now becoming familiar with it; it will be gone, this year of our Lord 2010, this trip around the Sun long before I'm ready.

When July dies, so does the summer. We will have many more sweltering days and nights of hiding inside in our cooled micro climates, but our minds are now fixed on going back to school, buying clothes for the fall, marking our calendars for things far removed from slow days and nine o'clock daylight. And I am saddened at the passing, at the noticeable, unrepentant whirl of time that I can't stop, can't even slow down for just a little while.

But tomorrow....August! For our family, August will bring birthdays, a new school, a new house, some new adventures. It is all good.

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven. Ecc. 3:1












Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Emily Dickinson's Nature

SOME keep the Sabbath going to church;
I keep it staying at home,
With a bobolink for a chorister,
And an orchard for a dome.






Some keep the Sabbath in surplice;
I just wear my wings,
And instead of tolling the bell for church,
Our little sexton sings.





God preaches,—a noted clergyman,—
And the sermon is never long;
So instead of getting to heaven at last,
I ’m going all along!






Be still and know that I am God! Psalm 46:10

Saturday, July 3, 2010

Celebrate Saturday: Summer at UNA

Celebrate this holiday Saturday by enjoying the beautiful campus of the University of North Alabama.














Friday, July 2, 2010

Folklife Fridays: Skip to my Lou


Remember the old songs?



We sang "Skip to my Lou" when I was a child. If we didn't know or forgot the words, we just made up our own. We sang it as we joined hands in circles and marched around.




Here's one version of the lyrics:



I lost my partner,What'll I do?I lost my partner,What'll I do?I lost my partner,What'll I do?Skip to my lou, my darlin'.



Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.



I'll find another onePrettier than you,I'll find another onePrettier than you,I'll find another onePrettier than you,Skip to my Lou, my darlin'


Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darling.



Fly's in the buttermilk,Shoo, fly, shoo,Fly's in the buttermilk,Shoo, fly, shoo,Fly's in the buttermilk,Shoo, fly, shoo,Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.


Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.


Cow's in the buttermilk,Moo, moo, moo Cow's in the buttermilk,Moo, moo, moo Cow's in the buttermilk,Moo, moo, moo Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.



Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darling.


A little red wagon,Painted blue.A little red wagon,Painted blue.A little red wagon,Painted blue.Skip to my Lou, my darling.



Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darling.



I lost my partner,What'll I do?I lost my partner,What'll I do?I lost my partner,What'll I do?Skip to my lou, my darlin'.


Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darlin'. Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,Skip to my Lou, my darling.





In early America, respectable folk in Protestant
communities have always regarded the fiddle as the devil’s instrument and dancing as downright sinful. Faced with such a religious prejudice for
socializing, young people of the frontier developed the “play-party,” in which all the objectionable features of a square dance were removed or masked so that their grave elders could approve. No instruments
were permitted - the dancers sang and clapped their own music. In time, the play-party acquired a life of its own. It became an ideal amusement for teenagers and young married couples. In many a frontier community, the bear hunters, Indian fighters, the rough keelboat men and the wild cowboys could be seen dancing innocently with their gals, like so many children at a Sunday school picnic. “Skip to My Lou” is a simple game of
stealing partners. It begins with any number of couples hand in hand,
skipping around in a ring. A lone boy in the center of the moving circle of
couple sings, “Lost my partner what’ll I do?” as the girls whirl past him.
The young man in the center hesitates while he decides which girl to choose, singing, “I'll get another one prettier than you.” When he grasps the hand of his chosen one, her partner then takes his place in the center of the ring and the game continues.
It's an ice-breaker, a good dance to get a group acquainted to one another and to get everyone in the mood for swinging around. It's interesting to note that “loo” is the Scottish word for “love.” The spelling change from “loo” to “lou” probably happened as our Anglo ancestors, and the song, became Americanized.
Source: The Folk Songs of North America, by Alan Lomax,
Doubleday.Recordings on File by:
Carter Family, Lead Belly, Mike & Peggy
Seeger, Pete Seeger.




We didn't know anything about fiddle music, or any kind of formal dancing. We just sang it because it was fun.

What was your favorite song from childhood?